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You are here: Home - Model History Timelines - Suzuki GSX-R750 Model History

The History of the Kawasaki Z introduction
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The History of the Kawasaki Z introduction
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1985 Suzuki GSX-R750
1985 Suzuki GSX-R750

In 1985 Suzuki GSX-R750 offered race-bred technology and performance at an affordable price. - Suzuki

 

Forward from Total Motorcycle

Welcome to Total Motorcycle's The Ultimate History Guide of the legendary Kawasaki Z! This must be the most complete guide to the Kawasaki Z ever written or I pitty the writer who did even more work! From 1972 to 2013 Total Motorcycle will take you back into the past of this legendary bike and into the future as well. If you do not learn something new about the Z from this Total Motorcycle Guide let me know and I'll be happy to eat my hat! Also if you have any further information about a model not listed here type it up and email it to me, I'll review it and be happy to include it.

 

How the Z was born


The first Kawasaki Z900 was actually inspired by Honda at the Tokyo Motor Show in late 1968 as Honda unvieled new CB750 Four. A move that surprised the designers at Kawsaki as they were designing their very own 750cc bike! The CB750 Four offered never before seen power and a new type of engine, the Inline-four. With an OHC valve train, 67 hp, 200 km / h top speed, 4-into-4 exhaust system and front disc brakes. Kawasaki scrapped the new 750 idea and started work on a new bigger bike; code named T103. The 903cc engine size was the target thanks to market research done in the USA.

Thanks to the U-Turn approach Kawasaki did in dumping the 750cc idea for a 903cc one Honda did not have the slightest suspecsion as to what was taking shape in the Kawasaki garage. And what would emerge to be the most powerful and fastest production motorcycle with the best technical ingredients, the finest details and the most exciting design riders ever seen to date.

In early 1972 Kawasaki had a road worthy Z900 concept and begain testing in the USA. Two teams were set to ride 6000 miles each on public roads from Atlanta Georgia to Santa Ana California and back while also testing on the Talladega Speedway in Alabama. The Z bikes - some with Honda Emblems camouflaged tank - survived this distance without any damage.

Kawasaki debuts the new Z900 SuperFour to the press, who are so excited about it write an avalanche of media stories which get the public excited about seeing the world exclusive premiere of Kawasaki's new Z900 at the 1972 IFMA in Cologne. When released for sale 2500 units are available and sold almost immediately as demand exceeds supply.


The Ultimate History of the Kawasaki Z

Since the debut of the 1972 Kawasaki Z1, motorcycles wearing the Z designation have revolutionised their respective eras and blasted a path to the future. Combining astonishing performance with advanced technologies and design, the Kawasaki Z bikes have had major impact on the history of high-performance motorcycles. This is the legend of the Kawasaki Z.

The legend was born in 1972 with the release of the model that started it all, the Kawasaki Z1. Featuring advanced Kawasaki technology, the Z1 completely redefined the world of high-performance motorcycling.

During development its code name was New York Steak. The letter Z was chosen because as the last letter of the alphabet it represented the most extreme, and the 1 stood for number one in the world.

The Z1 was the first mass-produced sports bike to feature a DOHC, 4-cylinder engine – technology found only on factory racing machines or limited production sports bikes. Displacing 903 cc, the Z1 was not only the fastest production motorcycle of its era, its reliability and durability were equally impressive.

The Z1 became a huge sales success in its target market of North America and also in Europe, and was equally successful on the race track.

Thus began the legend of the Z – a legend that continues to this day.


 

1985 Suzuki GSX-R750
1985 Suzuki GSX-R750

 

1972 Kawasaki Z - A Legend is Born

Featuring advanced Kawasaki technology, the Z1 completely redefined the world of high-performance motorcycling. During development its code name was New York Steak. The letter Z was chosen because as the last letter of the alphabet it represented the most extreme, and the 1 stood for number one in the world. The Z1 was the first mass-production sports bike to feature a DOHC, 4-cylinder engine - technology found only on factory racing machines or limited production sports bikes. Displacing 903 cc, the Z1 was not only the fastest production motorcycle of its era, its reliability and durability were equally impressive. Four mufflers accentuated the Z1's slim, sexy and sleek design. The Z1 became a huge sales success in its target market of North America and also in Europe, and was equally successful on the racetrack. Thus began the legend of Z - a legend that continues to this day.

With the 900Z1 Superfour began the Z story. 1972 this model was presented at the IFMA motorcycle show in Cologne. Until then there had been no comparable motorcycle with so much capacity and so much power. The 900Z1 Superfour was a coveted cult object - to this day.

1972 Kawasaki presented for the first time a motorcycle with four-stroke engine from them. The four-cylinder in the 900 Z1 Super Four, a completely new development with two overhead Camshaft, 903 cc, and according to the manufacturer 82 SAE horsepower at 8500 rpm strong sat in terms of motor and driving performance with the production motorcycles new standards. It was to beat next year though. With amassive engine and a 4-in-4-exhaust system the Z1 was a huge hit. With outstanding performance to her name". To date, the Kawasaki Z1 has successfully defended it's aura among classics.

1972 Kawasaki Z Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 903 cc
Power 58 kW (79 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm 72 at 7000 rpm
Net weight kg 246
Top speed 210 km / h

 

 

1974 Kawasaki Z400 (Europe)

The Z400 united many good features in an affordable motorcycle. The parallel twin engine was initially developed for the U.S. market as a robust and economical model for everyday life. It enjoyed but also extremely popular in Germany, and was built as Z440 and Z440 LTD as a soft chopper up in the eighties.

Kawasaki rose in 1974 in the Middle class with the four-stroke twin-cylinder Z400 designed for the U.S. market. The Z400 didn't have the power the Z900 had but was still a great tourer. One of the attractions of the Z400 was cheap insurance due to the lower horsepower (27 or 33 hp; thus it was at the level of Japanese 250cc competition). Vibrations of parallel twins were tamed by the overhead cam and balance shaft and the Z400 became known as an environmental, durable and most comfortable motorcycle.

1974 Kawasaki Z400 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 2 cylinders, 398 cc
24 kW (33 hp) at 9000/min
Torque Nm at 7500 rpm 31
Empty weight 187 kg
Maximum speed 135/140 km / h

 

1976 Kawasaki Z900 and Z750 (Europe)

The Z900 A4 comes with a second disc brake front, a reinforced frame and many detail improvements. From this year, Kawasaki offered with the parallel twin Z750 also a great touring bike.

Two years after the introduction of the Z1, Kawasaki renamed the Z1 the Z900. 1976 also led to new paint and design changes. The four-cylinder is simply called now Z900 and no longer had a black engine but a silver one. The main technical difference was the dual disc in front which increased braking performance significantly with less hand force. Also the 1976 Z900 offered a more stable frame.

1976 Kawasaki Z900 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 903 cc
Power 58 kW (79 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm 72 at 7000 rpm
Empty weight 252 kg
Top speed 210 km / h

 

 

1976 Kawasaki Z650 (Europe)

Entering production four years after Kawasaki's Z900 sporty oriented four-cylinder model the Z650 offered a mid range bike to complement the flagship 900. Unlike the big Z900, the Z650 had a 4-into-2 exhaust system. With 66 hp at 8500 rpm from 652 cc, the Z650 created a new displacement category versus the 500cc and the 550cc Japanese competitors and ranked number one in terms of performance in the area until the 750cc class pushed forward.

1976 Kawasaki Z650 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 2cylinders, 652 cc
Power 49 kW (66 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm at 7000 rpm 57
Empty weight 220 kg
Top speed 193 km / h

1976 Kawasaki Z750 (Europe)

In addition to the Z400, Kawasaki also created the 750cc (three-quarter-liter) class with a parallel twin. Two balancer shafts helped reduce the vibrations of the large volume cylinders. The Z750 DOHC engine prodived 50 hp at 7000 rpm and 60 Nm torque @ 3000 rpm, but the designers had less emphasis on sportiness and high peak power as their goal was a touring type engine for a relaxed ride.

1976 Kawasaki Z750 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 2 cylinders, 745 cc
Power 37 kW (50 hp) at 7000 rpm
Torque 60 Nm at 3000 rpm
Empty Weight 235 kg
Top speed 175 km / h

 

 

1977 Kawasaki Z1-R - Upscale Sports Bike with Avant-garde Design

During the 70's, café racers with racing inspired designs were all the rage. The Z1-R, successor to the mighty Z1, was a special café racer version of the Z1000. The Z1-R was designed in the U.S., the main market for the Z-Series. It featured a stunning silver livery and unique styling never before seen on a large displacement sports bike. A slim fuel tank accentuated the massive black engine, and a bar-mounted bikini fairing advertised the R-model's high performance. The Z1-R was also one of the first sports bikes to feature cast alloy wheels. Instead of the four mufflers of the Z1, the Z1-R used a 4-into-1 exhaust. The Z1-R heavily influenced the design of future Z-Series machines.

 

1977 Kawasaki Z1000, Z650 and Z200 (Europe)

With the Z1000, the magical capacity limit was cracked. At the same time, the model was also updated visually. Most notable here was the new 4-into-2 exhaust system. A great commercial success, the Z650, which brought the benefits and the look of the Z1000 in the middle class. Furthermore, Kawasaki thought of other target groups: With the Z200 a simply constructed cylinder came on the market, which was very cheap to obtain and operate.

Z1000: In 1977 Kawasaki enlarged the engine from 903cc to 1016cc by enlarging the bore four millimeters. This increased horsepower to 85hp @ 8000 rpm and increased torque from 73 Nm @ 7500 rpm to 81 Nm at 6500 rpm. With their new Z slogan "A bigger engine brings even more power, especially in lower speed range." Kawasaski succeded in creating a motorcycle even better than the original for day-to-day power use. Other changes were a new 4 into 2 exhaust system, modified swing arm mount to improve riding stability and a disc brake.

Z200: At the 1976 IFMA Kawasaki presented Z200 as a simple, robust and economical entry level model for everyday use. With a single-cylinder engine with overhead cam delivering 17 bhp @ 8000 rpm the z200 was well received both in terms of performance and cost. The Kawasaki Z200 offered an economic alternative to the much more complex 125cc two-cylinder Japanese competitors of the day and offered electric start, front disc brake and a lightweight 145kg weight.

 

1977 Kawasaki Z1000 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 1016 cc
Power 62 kW (85 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque Nm at 6500 rpm 81
Empty weight 256 kg
Top Speed 210 km /h

1977 Kawasaki Z200 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 1 cylinder, 197 cc
Power 12.5 kW (17 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque 15 Nm at 7000 rpm
Empty weight 145 kg
Top speed 120 km / h

 

 

 


 

 

1986 Suzuki GSX-R750
1986 Suzuki GSX-R750

 

1978 Kawasaki Z1300 - The 6-Cylinder Monster that Shocked the World

The Z-Series machines established the popularity of the air-cooled In-line Four. However, the series continued to evolve. The Z1300 was powered by a revolutionary, liquid-cooled In-line Six displacing an incredible 1,268 cc, the largest of its time. Harnessing the engine's massive power was a robust shaft drive. This flagship model boasted chassis and exterior components that were of the highest quality and performance. At 300 kg, the weight of this machine was equally impressive - in spite of this, test riders were seen wheelying the bike during its press launch. A road sport model built for fun, the Z1300 had so much power that it ran afoul of the West German horsepower regulations for motorcycles. The Z legend was now firmly established.

 

1978 Kawasaki Z1300 Specifications

Engine Type:


1978 Kawasaki Z1-R (Europe)

The readers of the Motorcycle magazine chose the Z1-R immediately after the release of the first photos for "Motorcycle of the Year". It had good reasons. Finally, the design of the Z1-R was not only unique and stylistic influence, but also tailored to the European market. This also marked the start of cast aluminum wheels.

The 1978 Kawasaki Z1-R was developed to concentrate on a more rounded design and look. Offering edges and corners more rounded look kept the new model fresh while technical advancements were slow to come to the market, thus Kawasaki's advertising focused on it's success in endurance racing. The Z1-R offered different handlebars, a fixed fairing, a square 13 liter tank, cast wheels and dual disc brakes which found favour with sport riders worldwide.

1978 Kawasaki Z1-R Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 1016 cc
Power 66 kW (90 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque Nm at 7000 rpm 81
Empty weight 260 kg
Top speed 212 km / h

1978 Kawasaki Z650LTD (Europe)

The Kawsaski Z650LTD was created from the inspiration of the junior German Cup races of 1978. While the 652cc engine remained technically unchanged, the German importer made extensive modifications by the addition of a new gas tank with narrow cusps and cast wheels with dual discs in front.

1978 Kawasaki Z650LTD (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 652 cc
Power 49 kW (66 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm at 7000 rpm 57
Empty weight 228 kg
Top speed 200 km / h

 

1979 Kawasaki Z1300, Z500 and Z250 (Europe)

This year, the Z1300 was clear with its six-cylinder engine in the center. The Z1000 MK II was a powerful Z-athletes, the sister model Z1000ST said the tour driver on by Cardan, long travel suspension and the big tank. In the middle class, the Z500 was made with a light weight four-cylinder, while the Z250 perfectly with a two-cylinder fit in the German 27-hp class.

 

1979 Kawasaki Z250A (Europe)

The 1979 Kawasaki Z250 was created as an in-house comptition. Taking the Z400 two-cylinder engine idea and modifying it for a shorter stroke with a single overhead cam with sharper performance characteristics; an impressive 27hp @ 10000 rpm was achived. Weighting just 166kg the Z250 not only handled great but also stopped great as well with the first disc brakes front and rear on a Kawasaki plus cast wheels. It was a technological marvel at the time.

1978 Kawasaki Z250A (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 2 cylinders, 249 cm ³
Power 20 kW (27 hp) at 10 000/min
Torque 20 Nm at 8500 rpm
Empty weight 166 kg
Top speed 145 km / h


1979 Kawasaki Z400 (Europe)

In 1979 Kawasaki already had the Kawasaki Z400B, but wanted to refresh the looks of the 400, thus the Z400G was born. With new perforated disc brakes in the front, newly innovated seven-spoke cast wheels and sintered metal pads, braking power improved but horsepower was reduced to 27hp @ 9000 rpm. Because of the horsepower reduction Kawasaki found the Z400G in competition with the Z250A.

1978 Kawasaki Z400 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 2 cylinders, 398 cc
Power 20 kW (27 hp) at 9000/min
Torque Nm at 7500 rpm 29
Empty weight 182 kg
Top speed 141 km / h

 

1979 Kawasaki Z500 (Europe)

With the introduction of the 1979 Z500, Kawasaki crates the half-liter class of bikes and riders appreciated the affordable insurance class of the 500cc. With 50hp @ 9000 rpm and 43 Nm of torque at 7500 rpm the Z500 rode well, was a good ride, light in weight at 210kg fully fueled vs the 650cc class. With triple disc brakes, cast wheels the Z500 was quite a comptitive motorcycle in it's class.

1978 Kawasaki Z500 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 498 cm ³
Power 37 kW (50 hp) at 9000/min
Torque 43 Nm at 7500 rpm
Empty weight 210 kg
Top speed 182 km / h

 

 

1979 Kawasaki Z650SR (Europe)

The 1979 Kawasaki Z650SR was Kawasaki's first custom bike for the beginning of the 1980s custom look boom. The "SR" was Kawasaki's designation for a "soft chopper" and they gave the SR raised handlebars, a modified tank-seat combination and the crossed manifold of the exhaust system which made the Z650SR look more "Easy Rider" style. While the Z650SR's engine was identical to the Z650, the Z650SR frame was greatly modified and also allowed the use of 16" tires.

1978 Kawasaki Z650SR (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 652 cc
Power 48 kW (65 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm at 7000 rpm 57
Empty weight 236 kg
Top speed 178 km / h

 

1979 Kawasaki Z1000 MKII (Europe)

With the end of the 70s and start of the 1980 model year manufacturers were expericing the start of a motorcycle sales boom and started offering a huge variety of motorcycle models to the rider. As with any sales boom the market was flooded with very similar bikes and Kawasaki needed a bike to stand out. Enter the new 1979 Kawasaki Z1000 MKII motorcycle, the successor to the standard 1977 Z1000. Offering a completely new look and technology package the new Z1000 MKII had 94hp @ 8000rpm and 86 Nm of torque at 7000rpm. With a shortened 86mm caster and 1485mm wheelbase the Z1000 MKII now handled ever better in the corners.

1978 Kawasaki Z1000 MKII (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 1016 cc
Power 69 kW (94 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque Nm at 7000 rpm 86
Empty weight 264 kg
Top speed 211 km / h
Price (1979) 9568 Mark

 

1979 Kawasaki Z1000ST (Europe)

Kawasaki needed a new tourer and the Z1000ST was their answer. For a small additional amount over the Z1000, the Z1000ST offered shaft drive, longer travel front and rear suspension, a larger gas tank, modified frame for better directional stability and a higher torque motor, all for long trips in mind. With 97hp and 90 Nm torque the ST offered slightly higher performance.

1978 Kawasaki Z1000ST (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 1016 cc
Power 71 kW (97 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque 90 Nm at 7000 rpm
Empty weight 276 kg
Top speed 214 km / h

 

1979 Kawasaki Z1300 (Europe)

With Honda selling the CBX1000 6 cylinder motorcycle successfully on the market Kawasaki wanted to create one of their own. With six water cooled cylinders, three twin carburettors, shaftdrive and 99 horsepower (unrestricted: 120 hp) with 102 Nm torque the 1979 Kawasaki Z1300 was the answer. The Z1300 was no lightweight however, weighing in at 318kg. Both the Z1300 and the Honda CBX represented the height of motorcycle engineering and complexity.

1978 Kawasaki Z1300 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 6 cylinders, 1286 cc
Power 73 kW (99 hp) at 7500 rpm
Torque 102 Nm at 6000 rpm
Empty weight 318 kg
Top speed 213 km / h

 

1980 Kawasaki Z250C (Europe)

One year after the introduction of the Kawasaki Z250 came the Z250C. The single cylinder engine with an overhead camshaft was designed to offer riders a less expensive insurance class as the Z250C offered an easy to use 17 hp @ 8000 rpm and 19 Nm @ 4000 rpm of torque.

Featuring an electric starter motor, easy to ride comfort, and a low weight with full tank of 132 kg for superior handling. To keep costs down the Z250C also came with integrated drum brakes front and rear with cast wheels.

1980 Kawasaki Z250C (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, Displacement: 1 cylinder, 246 cc
Power 13 kW (17 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque 19 Nm at 4000 rpm
Empty Weight 132 kg
Top speed 126 km / h

 

1980 Kawasaki Z250LTD (Europe)

The 1980 Kawasaki Z250LTD represented the entry level into the custom chopper style made popular by the movie Easy Rider with Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper. With sweeping high handlebars, a stepped seat and a small 16-inch rear wheel the bike had the right looks for the day. Using the same engine as the Z250C and offering the same wheels the Z250LTD was more of an excercise in looks than performance.

1980 Kawasaki Z250LTD (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, Displacement: 1 cylinder, 246 cc
Power 13 kW (17 hp) at 7000 rpm
Torque 19 Nm at 4000 rpm
Empty weight 139 kg
Top speed 121 km / h

 

1980 Kawasaki Z400F (Europe)

The smallest engine model in the new 1980 program for offering sporty four-cylinder motorcycle from Kawasaki. The 399cc four cylinder offered the best of three worlds, performance at an affordable price and affordable insurance rates. With 27hp @ 8000rpm and a top speed of 154km/h the Z400F was originally destined for the Japanese home market but interest internationally had Kawasaki selling the Z400F worldwide.

1980 Kawasaki Z400F (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 399 cc
Power 20 kW (27 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque Nm 28 at 6500 rpm
Empty weight 210 kg
Top speed 154 km / h

 

1980 Kawasaki Z440 (Europe)

The 1980 Kawasaki Z440 was the successor to the popular Z400 two-cylinder model. By increasing the bore to 67.5mm displacement rose to 443cc. Peak horsepower now came on at a lower RPM of 7000 and the torque curve was significantly improved with 32 Nm at just 3000rpm. Especially to the pointed out already favorable torque curve once further optimization. already at 3000 rpm with 33 Nm.

1980 Kawasaki Z440 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 2 cylinders, 443 cc
Power 20 kW (27 hp) at 7000 rpm
Torque Nm 32 at 3000 rpm
Net weight kg 189
Top speed 137 km / h

 

1980 Kawasaki Z550LTD (Europe)

With the introduction of the LTD custom look series with high handlebars and a sweeping stepped bench seat, the Z500LTD represented the mid displacement option offering a new 553cc engine upgraded from the Z500. The new 550LTD engine offered more horsepower (50hp) and higher torque all at a lower rpm. Riders found 50hp to be a magical number for performance and even though the Z550LTD's top speed was 178km/h few dared it.

1980 Kawasaki Z550LTD (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 553 cc
Power 37 kW (50 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque 45 Nm at 7000 rpm
Empty weight kg 211
Top speed 178 km / h

 

1980 Kawasaki Z750E (Europe)

While the Kawasaki Z650 was a great bike and met the market head on for it's needs, needs changed in 1980 and the market wanted a 750cc bike. With the introduction of the Honda CB750K and Suzuki GSX750, Kawasaki had their work cut out. What was created was the Z750E, taking the Z650 engine and increasing it's bore 4mm engine size grew to 739cc and performance grew as well to 77hp @ 9500rpm. The new Z750, whose engine was based on the Z650, brought also new dynamic to the upper middle class.

1980 Kawasaki Z750E (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 739 cc
Power 57 kW (77 hp) at 9500/min
Torque Nm 63 at 7500 rpm
Empty weight 228 kg
Top speed 203 km / h

 

1980 Kawasaki Z750LTD (Europe)

The biggest chopper in the Kawasaki lineup the Z750LTD replaced previous biggest one, the Z650SR. The 1980 Kawasaki Z750LTD offered raised handlebars, stepped seat and 20mm greater suspension fork travel but weight climbed another 25kg. Thankfully the engine was from the Z750E and was tuned to 74hp @ 9000 rpm make this chopping a performance machine as well.

1980 Kawasaki Z750E (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 738 cc
Power 54 kW (74 hp) at 9000/min
Torque Nm 62 at 8000 rpm
Empty weight 225 kg
Top speed 170 km / h

 

1980 Kawasaki Z1000 FI (Fuel Injection) (Europe)

Kawasaki again belonged to the pioneers in motorcycle construction. With the introduction of the 1980 Z1000 it was the first time for fuel injection in the Kawasaki motorcycle model lineup even though fuel injection was already standard in the car industry. While horsepower and torque did not significatly change from the carburetored Z1000ST version, the addition of FI to the Z1000FI offered sophisticated smooth engine running and responsiveness.

1980 Kawasaki Z1000 FI (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 1016 cc
Power 71 kW (97 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque Nm at 7000 rpm 89
Empty weight 264 kg
Top speed 218 km / h

 




1986 Suzuki GSX-R750R
1986 Suzuki GSX-R750R

 

1981 Kawasaki Z1100GP - The 2nd Generation Z

Based on feedback from Kawasaki's superbike racers, the 2nd generation Z models began with the Z1000 (J) in 1981. The Z1100GP, based on the Z1000, featured a larger 1,089.9 cc engine and greatly improved comfort. Its rectangular headlight and black engine and mufflers gave it a very sporty image. It also featured a unique rectangular instrument panel. The Z1100GP was also one of the first motorcycles of its era to offer fuel injection (K.E.F.I.: Kawasaki Electronic Fuel Injection) - technology made available on production bikes only by Kawasaki at the time. Compared with carburettors, this system allowed more precise engine management by adjusting fuel delivery according to changes in atmospheric pressure and temperature. The results were more power and improved fuel economy.

1981 Kawasaki Z1100GP Specifications
Overall

 

1981 Kawasaki Z650F (Europe)

Kawasaki wasn't going to continue the Z650 for 1981 as it had remained unchanged since it's introduction in 1976; but with some upgrades and small technical improvements the Z650 became the Z650F. New were cast wheels, two disc brakes in the front and one in the rear, new paint job, but also additional technical improvements which had been introduced with the Z750E. Power was 67 hp @ 9000/min and the Z650F offer a 190 km/h top speed proved the Z650F still had a lot of life left. Also as a side benefit cost price was significantly cheaper than the other 750cc four-cylinder motorcycles available.

1981 Kawasaki Z650F (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 652 cc
Power 49 kW (67 hp) at 9000/min
Torque Nm at 7500 rpm 54
Empty weight 226 kg
Top speed 190 km / h

 

1981 Kawasaki Z750L (Europe)

Just one year in, the Z750 receives a new look to attact buyers. Angular forms replaced rounded edges of the previous model. Squared tank edges, new seat hump, new fenders plus a square headlight created a completely new look. Performance though was unchanged.

1981 Kawasaki Z650F (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 739 cc
Power 57 kW (77 hp) at 9500/min
Torque Nm 63 at 7500 rpm
Empty Weight 232 kg
Top speed 203 km / h

 

1981 Kawasaki Z1000J and Z550 (Europe)

The Z1000J represented Kawasaki's sportist model in 1981 with it's changed 999cc engine that was an ideal base for the growing popularity of 1000cc class racing activities as well as riding in everyday life with its 72 kW (98 hp). The Z1000J gained success in the rank of racing especially in the AMA Superbike.

The 1981 Kawasaki Z550 was developed from the Z500, which increased horsepower and torque significantly at the same rpm vs the Z500; although both horsepower and torque peak numbers were the same. Overall, however, the torque curve across the entire engine speed range became more favorable. The biggest technologic improvement was the new electronic ignition.

1981 Kawasaki Z1000J (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 999 cm ³
Power 72 kW (98 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm at 7500 rpm 86
Empty weight 253 kg
Top speed 212 km / h

1981 Kawasaki Z500 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 554 cc
Power 37 kW (50 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque 45 Nm at 7000 rpm
Empty weight 216 kg
Top speed 173 km / h

 

1981 Kawasaki Z1000LTD (Europe)

With the success of the Z750LTD, Kawasaki created the biggest custom yet, the 1981 Kawasaki Z1000LTD. With the powerful inline-four 998cc engine and custom accessores made the Z1000LTD the flagship Kawasaki chopper everyone wanted.

With 95 bhp @ 8500 rpm Kawasaki could claim that the Z1000LTD was the most powerful cruiser with loads of reserve pulling power on the market.

1981 Kawasaki Z1000LTD (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 998 cc
Power 70 kW (95 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm at 7500 rpm 81
Empty weight 254 kg
Top speed 211 km / h

 

1981 Kawasaki Z1100ST (Europe)

Two years after Kawasaki introduced their Z1100ST came the Z1100ST, a bigger, smoother more comfortable touring bike. With more power (97hp @ 8000 rpm, 93 @ 6500 torque) down low, a smooth engine with silent blocks to reduce vibrations, a long spring and air-assisted strut suspesion, more comfortable seat, a new fuel gauge and an automatic indicator reset made for extra comfort.

1981 Kawasaki Z1000ST (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 1089 cc
Power 71 kW (97 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque Nm at 6500 rpm 93
Empty weight 271 kg
Top speed 212 km / h

 


 

 

1987 Suzuki GSX-R750
1987 Suzuki GSX-R750

1982 Kawasaki Z750GT (Europe)

Touring was being quite the craze and riders wanted to see the sights on bikes. With Kawasaki introducing shaft drive to it's touring models like the Z1000, Z1100ST and Z1300, the new Z750GT extended the sports tourer shaft drive lineup.

The Z750GT was derived from the Z750E model with a revised engine and dual overhead camshafts that contributed to a healthy 78 hp @ 9500rpm. Forks were air-assisted shocks and had progressive action but could be easily load adjusted. Engine was rubber mounted and an oil cooler helped to promote moderate engine temperatures under long range loads. Kawasaki even included a large tank, shaft drive and comfortable bench seat.

1982 Kawasaki Z750GT (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 739 cc
Power 57 kW (78 hp) at 9500/min
Torque Nm 63 at 7500 rpm
Empty weight kg 243
Top speed 205 km / h

 

1982 Kawasaki Z750LTD (Europe)

In 1982 Kawasaki offered the Z750LTD as a 750cc parallel-twin again from the previous four-cylinder engine. With two overhead camshafts and two balancer shafts and making 49hp @ 7000 rpm, (which was significantly less power than the 4-cylinder version), Kawasaki went full bore for looks and sound over pure performance. The new Z750LTD offered contactless ignition for ease of maintenance and a rubber mounted handlebar for comfort.

1982 Kawasaki Z750LTD (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 2 cylinders, 745 cc
Power 36 kW (49 hp) at 7000 rpm
Torque 60 Nm at 3000 rpm
Empty weight 222 kg
Top speed 175 km / h

 

1982 Kawasaki Z1000R - Eddie Lawson Inspiration

In North America, the main market for big-bore sports bikes, superbike racing using highly modified production bikes was even more popular than World GP and attracted some of the world's top riders. In 1981 Eddie Lawson won the championship for Kawasaki on a factory Z1000S. The Z1000R was built to commemorate that victory. The "Eddie Lawson Replica" was painted the same lime green as the Z1000S, and was a very popular model around the world. Like the Z1000S, the R model came with a Kerker 4-into-1 exhaust, a stepped seat and reservoir-equipped rear shocks.

1982 Kawasaki Z1000R - Eddie Lawson

THE LEGEND LIVES ON

After the highly acclaimed and hard-fought victory by Eddie Lawson in the AMA Superbike Championship in 1982 is the Kawasaki for the 1983 season is the Z 1000R - a flawless replica of the master street compliant machine.

Striking is the typical garish green Kawasaki paint with black and white decor strips, a small fairing (from GPZ1100B2) and the typical kink in the seat with a low driver's seat cushion. Stunning visual appearance complete with rear Piggyback shocks and a smoky sound.

Changes - The Steering head angle changed from 62.5 to 61 degrees in order to provide more stability. The caster is enlarged by 15 millimeters. A revised braking system and a wider rear rim (2.50 instead of 2.15 in) complete the chassis improvements. The painted all black engine receives a modified cylinder head for more gas flow rate and an oil cooler from the GPZ1100, the operating temperature of the maintains a moderate level. A sticker on the tank, carrying Eddie Lawson signature reminiscent of winning a championship

Differences can be identified, especially in looks. Thus the tank, side covers and base color but remains the same. The sticker on the tank mentions Lawson's second "AMA Champion Superbike Champion" in white Scripture. The instruments are sitting in a common housing. The swingarm falls from 10 millimeters longer and has slightly different reinforcements. In addition, it has once again modified the cylinder head slightly.

This model is the one that imported Kawasaki Germany.Japan only 500 units are available. While Lawson Replica in the U.S.A has 102 horseposer; Germany has 98 horsepower. This is largely due to the temperate, TUV-compliant four-into-two exhaust system and bespoke carburetor tuning.

From 4000 rpm the power comes on, 6500 rpm's and above a huge surge of power. Combined with the easy switchable Five-speed transmission provide impressive performance. Top speed measures an incredible 223 km; not bad for an almost
faired motorcycle. Thus the Z1000R joins the ranks of the fastest Kawasaki Four-cylinder bikes, only the '83-GPZ1100 has been quicker to date.

The Z1000R is sold for only one year in Germany due to the impending new four-cylinder generation Kawasaki GPZ with the sporting codes. The top model in the range, the GPZ900R with a liquid-cooled four-valve engine marks a new milestone in 1984
in the history of the brand. Other European countries and the U.S. have the Lawson for sale from 1983 to 1985 and displacement is enlarged to 1090 cc with 114 hp peak output. The era of the legendary air-cooled Kawasaki four-cylinder is coming to an end.

HIGHLIGHTS
Z1000R, model year 1983
• Four-cylinder with double overhead camshafts
• 999 cm3 for Superbike regulations as Z1000J
• modified cylinder head
• first in Kawasaki lime-green line painting in Germany
• Oil cooler and cockpit shell of GPZ1100B2
• Kerker four-into-one exhaust system for the U.S. version
• Rear shocks with reservoir
• typical level in the field of driver seat
• only 500 units built in Japan
• Top 223 km / h
Conclusion: Rapid AMA Design & power-hungry series engine and stable suspension




1982 Kawasaki Z1000R Specifications

Kawasaki Z1000R, model year 1983
Engine Air-cooled four-cylinder four-stroke in-line, DOHC, two valves per combustion chamber
Displacement 999 cm! Bore x stroke 69.4 x 66 mm Compression Ratio 9.2:1 Power 98 hp (72
kW) at 8500 rpm Max torque 85 Nm (8.7 mkg) at 7000 rpm Fuel system
Four Mikuni CV carburetors, Ø 34 mm Transmission Five-speed rear-wheel drive
Chain Frame Double cradle steel frame Wheelbase 1520 mm Rake /
Grad/113 trailing 61 mm Seat height 740 mm front suspension forks with! 38 mm
Steel tube swingarm rear suspension with two strut Spring travel, front / rear
145/80 mm wheels light alloy wheels tires Front tire Rear 4.25 3.25 V19 V18
Front brake Dual discs, Ø 280 mm, single-piston floating calipers Rear Brakes
Disc, Ø 270 mm, single-piston caliper Dry weight (curb weight) 260 kg Fuel Capacity
21 liters no emission speed of 223 km / h Color Lime
Green with blue and white stripes RRP (1983) 10 590 DM

 

 

1983 Kawasaki Z550F (Europe)

Kawasaki Uni-Trak system is first introduced in the 1982 Kawasaki Z550F with a central spring strut. New sintered metal pads and double disc brakes in the front made rider control, even in the wet, easy. A drum rear brake and O-Ring chain final drive made maintainance easy as well.

1983 Kawasaki Z550GT (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 554 cc
Power 37 kW (50 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm at 7000 rpm 46
Empty weight 208 kg
Top speed 184 km / h

 

1983 Kawasaki Z550GT (Europe)

After positive sales experiences with the Z750GT; Kawasaki increased their tourer line with a new 554cc based on the proven Z550 reliable four-cylinder engine with an oil cooler producing 50 hp @ 8500 rpm with a shorter final drive ratio for more toque and a shaft final drive. Using two air-assisted spring front fork legs together with a fill valve the suspension adjusted to different loads much better.

1983 Kawasaki Z550GT (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 554 cc
Power 37 kW (50 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm at 7000 rpm 46
Empty weight 208 kg
Top speed 184 km / h

 

1983 Kawasaki Z1000R (Europe)

Eddie Lawson won the US AMA Superbike title in 1981 and 1982 on a 1000cc Kawasaki in the Kawasaki racing bright green paint color scheme. The 1983 Kawasaki Z1000R continues with the replica looking Kawasaki Z1000 he rode as an offshoot. Featuring a small front cowling, modified camshafts, modified carburetors, new rear shocks with reservoir and increased horsepower.

1983 Kawasaki Z550GT (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 999 cm ³
Power 72 kW (98 hp) at 8500 rpm
Torque Nm at 7000 rpm 85
Empty weight 260 kg
Top speed 220 km / h

 

1983 Kawasaki Z1000R and Z550GT (Europe)

1981 and 1982 Eddie Lawson won on a lime-green Z1000 the AMA Superbike title in the U.S.. The inspired Kawasaki to a green special series based on the Z1000J. Today, one of the most coveted Z1000R Z models at all. For the middle class the Kawasaki Z550GT brings shaftdrive to the market.

 

1985 Kawasaki Z750 Sport (Europe)

With the 1985 Kawasaki Z750 Sport was the first model to not use the Uni-Trak spring system but a to use a traditional front fork instead. The Z750 Sport rested on traditional Kawasaki virtues and offered the least expensive 750cc motorcycle in the 750cc Kawasaki model lineup.

The proven twin cam engine with two valves per cylinder produced 80hp @ 9500rpm which was enough for sporty performance. In contrast to the newly revised Kawasaki GPZ models, the Z750 had traditional lines but with the number of customers preferring the more modern design the Z750 sales reign was at and end.

1985 Kawasaki Z550GT (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 739 cc
Power 59 kW (80 hp) at 9500/min
Torque Nm at 7500 rpm 66
Empty weight 234 kg
Top speed 204 km / h

 

1991 Kawasaki Zephyr 550 (Europe)

Classic style was again gaining popularity and Kawasaski knew they could produce a classic bikes within the old Z lineup for today's rider. The 1991 Kawasaki Zephyr 550 was the completely new model in classic style. With a double-cradle steel frame and the air-cooled inline four-cylinder with double overhead Camshaft and two valves from the 1980's Z550 models fitted the new Zephyr looked the part. New large diameter front suspension, a sturdy aluminum swingarm and current 17-inch tires provided strong driving stability while dual-piston caliper disc brakes improved controllability and braking.

1991 Kawasaki Zephyr 550 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 554 cc
Power 37 kW (50 hp) at 10 000/min
Torque 40 Nm at 6000 rpm
Empty weight 200 kg
Top speed 140 km / h

 

1991 Kawasaki Zephyr 750 (Europe)

Produced simultaneously with the Kawasaki Zephyr 550, the Zephyr 750 followed the same classic design principle. Using an air-cooled inline four-cylinder with two overhead cam with roots that stretched back to the Z650 of 1976 and its Z750 successor.

Unfortunately when using an old engine from the past, exhaust and noise regulations change and Kawasaki could not quite match the performance of the original engine and had to make do with 72 hp @ 9500/min. Even with a lowered horsepower the Zephyr 750 due to it's classic looks and modern ride was a sales hit around the world.

1991 Kawasaki Zephyr 750 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 739 cc
Power 53 kW (72 hp) at 9500/min
Torque Nm 59 at 7300/min
Empty Weight 215 kg
Top speed 203 km / h

1992 Kawasaki Zephyr 1100 (Europe)

Thanks to the sales success of the 1991 Kawasaki Zephyr 550 and Zephyr 750, Kawasaki decided to introduce the Zephyr 1100 in 1992. In the big bike category it was the timeless classic. The air-cooled engine offered superior performance in all situations, and special technical features such as a slipper clutch or a secondary air system called the Clean Air were on board. With dual overhead camshafts, two balancer shafts and producing 93 hp and 88 Nm of torque mated with a classic chassis with contemporary suspension components for a very pleasant ride. The classic design concept was a big success.

1991 Kawasaki Zephyr 1100 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 1062 cc
Power 68 kW (93 hp) at 8000 rpm
Torque Nm 88 at 7000 rpm
Empty weight 262 kg
Top speed 210 km / h

 

1999 Kawasaki ZR-7 (Europe)

With the end of the Zephy line Kawasaki was looking for something classic yet modern and inexpensive to produce, thus in 1999 introduced the ZR7. The 1999 Kawasaki ZR-7 was a sophisticated motorcycle in contemporary design and marketed for every riding application. The engine was based on the Zephyr 750, but with some improvements brought to the cylinder head and gearbox. Kawasaki was able to produce even more horsepower (76hp) and more toque (88 Nm) than the original Zephyr 750.

Kawasaki offered the Uni-Trak suspension system once again with moden design features like a new tank, double cradle steel frame, lighter swingarm and a 4 into 1 exhaust system.

1991 Kawasaki Zephyr 750 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 739 cc
Power 56 kW (76 hp) at 9500/min
Torque Nm 63 at 7300/min
Empty weight 229 kg
Top speed 209 km / h

 

 

 

 


 

 

1987 Suzuki GSX-R750
1987 Suzuki GSX-R750

2001 Kawasaki ZR-7S (Europe)

Two years after the successful introduction of the ZR7 came the ZR7S. Pushed two years after the introduction of the ZR-7 After the Kawasaki ZR-7S. Both the ZR7F and ZR7S were the same as each other mechancially but offered new harder springs and firmer damping. The half cowling gave the ZR-7S model a new design facelift as well as allowing the driver wind-weather protection and slightly higher top speed; however, this increased weight by 7 kgs.

1991 Kawasaki Zephyr 750 (Europe) Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 739 cc
Power 56 kW (76 hp) at 9500/min
Torque Nm 63 at 7300/min
Empty weight 236 kg
Top speed 211 km / h

 

 

START HERE

 

2003 Kawasaki Z1000 - The Z is Reborn as a Super-Naked

The 2003 Kawasaki Z1000 represented a return to the Z-models' roots but with a modern engine and design flair. Rather than track performance and ultimate horsepower, the Z1000 delivered the traditional virtues of the Z-bikes: a sports bike that prioritised the rider "fun factor." The Z1000's 953 cc liquid-cooled 4-cylinder engine was based on the Ninja ZX-9R power plant rather than a previous Z model. Featuring a special cylinder head and fuel injection, the engine was tuned for more low- and mid-range torque. The four stylish mufflers were reminiscent of the original Z1, and the large-diameter, steel-tube diamond frame was fitted with top-shelf suspension components for responsive handling. Ultra-modern styling cues included an angular headlight and a sexy and compact tail cowl, giving the bike an aggressive look and creating a new genre: the Super-Naked was born.


2003 Kawasaki Z1000 Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 953 cc
Power 93 kW (127 hp) at 10 000/min
Torque Nm at 8000 rpm 96
Empty weight 217 kg
Top speed 245 km / h

 

2003 Kawasaki Z1000 (Europe)

The new Z1000 again set the standards in the market. With exciting streetfighter look and extremely eye-catching four-pipe mufflers style 900Z1 Superfour woke the Z1000 buyers appetites for older Z-sports enthusiasts and young riders alike. The engine was based on the Ninja ZX-9R. Upside-down fork and polished rims beds in series were other highlights.

 

2004 Kawasaki Z750 (Europe)

The Z750 was not just the little sister of the Z1000 but in many ways the Z1000 equal in performance even though the Z750 had 17hp less. The Z750 embodied everything that Kawasaki made. Featuring aggressive headlights, superior engine performance, a bassy sound and many technically elaborate details. A perfect and inexpensive motorcycle for all types of riding. The Z750S version had a three-quarter fairing and full lenght seat for passengers.

2004 Kawasaki Z750 and Z750S Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity: 4 cylinders, 748 cc
Power 81 kW (110 hp) at 11 000/min
Torque 75 Nm at 8200 rpm
Empty weight 204 kg
Top speed 225 km / h

 

 


 

 

1987 Suzuki GSX-R750
1987 Suzuki GSX-R750

2007 Kawasaki Z1000 - Shocking Style and More Refined Performance

This highly refined 2nd iteration Z1000 was based on the earlier Z1000 that had received rave reviews in Europe. Chassis upgrades included an all-new steel-tube diamond frame that incorporated a new aluminium sub-frame and mounted the engine as a stressed member, and a 25 mm longer wheelbase. Displacement remained unchanged at 953 cc, but improvements to the intake and exhaust systems resulted in more low- and mid-range torque for blazing acceleration at the cost of just 2hp. Other upgrades included radial-mount front brake calipers, and lightweight front and rear petal discs offering superior heat dissipation. The all-new exterior design included integrated radiator guards accentuating the Z1000's concentrated, massive image. ABS was available as an option.


2007 Kawasaki Z1000 Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity R4, 953 cc
Power 92 kW (125 hp) at 10 000/min
Torque Nm at 8200 rpm 99
Empty weight 221 kg
Top speed 250 km / h

 

2007 Kawasaki Z750 and Z750S (Europe)

The second edition of the highly successful Kawasaki Z750. A slightly modified frame geometry extended wheelbase slightly and gave the bike more comfort for passages and a stiffened chassis, an adjustable upside-down fork and wave brake discs offered up a very sporty ride. The new engine tuning produced additional torque (but at the cost of a few horsepower) allowed Kawasaki to decrease fuel consumption. Both the Z750 and Z750S' naked bike history can be visibilty seen thanks to clearly visible 748cc engine. ABS was available as an option as well as the Z750S version had a three-quarter fairing.


2007 Kawasaki Z750 and Z750S Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity R4, 748 cc
Power 78 kW (106 hp) at 10 500 rpm
Torque Nm 78 at 8300/min
Empty weight 225 kg
Top speed 230 km / h

 


 

 

1987 Suzuki GSX-R750
1987 Suzuki GSX-R750

2010 Kawasaki Z1000 - Original Engine and Chassis to Create the Ultimate Z

To take the Super-Naked concept even further and made the 3rd iteration Z1000 even more fun to ride, Kawasaki's engineers discarded the earlier method of using an existing superbike platform and instead started from scractch. They designed an all-new 1,043 cc engine tuned for hard-hitting low- and mid-range torque. Even the sound from the airbox and intake ducts during acceleration was used to enhance the ride feel. The chassis features a new aluminium twin-tube frame for responsive handling and light weight. Another interesting feature is the Horizontal Back-link rear suspension that contributes to mass centralisation and improved manoeuvrability. A low-profile front cowl and high tank are complemented by specially designed wheels and stylish front fork guards, giving the latest Z1000 a powerful, dynamic form.

The new Kawasaki Z1000 caused quite a stir. This unique naked bike design was a completely new approach adding on design cues from the Kawasaki's past. The engine offers enormous power from the bottom end and the throaty intake sound makes the every rider addicted after a short time.


2010 Kawasaki Z1000 Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity R4, 1043 cc
Power 101.5 kW (138 hp) at 9600/min
Torque 110 Nm at 7800 rpm
Empty weight 221 kg
Top speed 240 km / h

 

 

 

2011 Kawasaki Z750R (Europe)

The Kawasaki Z750R took many popular tuning measures the forefront. With high-quality suspension technology and a gorgeous aluminum swingarm with higher damping more adjustment front and rear, powerful brakes with radial-mount, unique seat and two tone paint made the Z750R version differ in detail of the normal Z750 and saved the owner countless workshop hours.

2011 Kawasaki Z750R Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity R4, 748 cc
Power 78 kW (106 hp) at 10 500 rpm
Torque Nm 78 at 8300/min
Empty weight 227 kg
Top speed 230 km / h

 

 

2011 Kawasaki Z1000SX (Europe)

With the introduction of the new Z1000 last year, Kawasaki decided to produce a touring model called the Z1000SX. A full faired motorcycle with more ergonomic details, better aerodynamics and higher top speed but with mechanicals largly unchanged from the Z1000. The Z1000SX is also available as a The Z1000SX Tourer. In North America the Z1000SX is called the Ninja 1000 and Ninja 1000 Tourer.

2011 Kawasaki Z750R Specifications

Engine type, engine capacity R4, 1043 cc
Power 101.5 kW (138 hp) at 9600/min
Torque 110 Nm at 7800 rpm
Empty weight 231 kg
Top speed 245 km / h

 

 

2014 Kawasaki Future Z

After writing this entire guide and studing the Kawasaki's Z's history (both good and bad points), I would like to see Kawasaki produce again a basic UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle) simular to the ZRX1200 or even Zypher/ZR7 in style, ergonomics and purpose. While the new 2nd and 3rd Generation Z750 and Z1000 motorcycle are impressive from a technological view point they are just not the "Z" classic style of motorcycle riders and customers want and unfortunately really are just "Z" models mostly due to the name and mostly naked inline-4 engine appearance. It would be nice to see Kawasaki again produce a line of classic bikes as they did with the new W800.





 

 

 

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